1. 01/01/1986 This is a study in Mozambique on dietary cyanide exposure. 52 pages, illustrations, photos
  2. 25/01/2016 Certaines cultures tropicales contiennent des glycosides cyanogènes, des substances toxiques qui libèrent de l’acide cyanhydrique (HCN, aussi appelé le cyanure ou l’acide prussique) lorsque les cellules sont écrasées. La consommation de ces plantes sans les cuire peut causer un empoisonnement au...
  3. 01/10/2005 In Cassava Cyanide Diseases News (CCDN), Issue 4,December 2004, Dr. J. Howard Bradbury wrote about a method of processing cassava that could substantially reduce the cyanide content of flour.
  4. 20/11/2015 Some tropical crops contain cyanogenic glycosides, toxic substances that release hydrocyanic acid (HCN; also referred to as cyanide) when cells are crushed. Consuming these plants without cooking them can cause cyanide poisoning, with varying effects depending on cyanide levels and how long a...
  5. 01/01/2014 Penny Rambacher, une nutritionniste agréée qui travaille avec Miracles in Action au Guatemala. Il y a environ huit ans, Martin Price, alors directeur général d’ECHO, avait suggéré à Penny que la réintroduction de la chaya pourrait être une façon importante de lutter contre la malnutrition dans ce...
  6. 01/10/2005 Konzo is an irreversible disease that appears suddenly and causes spastic paralysis of both legs. Konzo affects mainly women and children, afflicting thousands in the remote rural areas of Bandundu Province in the Democratic Republic of Congo. It has also been reported from remote rural areas in...
  7. 20/07/2003 In response to the articles on leaf protein concentrate and on chaya in EDN Issue 78, a reader asked whether or not leaf protein concentrate (LPC) could safely be made from chaya.
  8. 19/07/1992 Dr. Rosling does not like the statement “cassava contains cyanide.” A food that contained pure hydrogen cyanide could be easily detoxified (it would be driven off as a gas by cooking). If any free cyanide is present in cassava, it can easily be driven off into the air by temperatures over 28C (82...
  9. 09/03/2015 Cassava is a staple food for over 800 million people in approximately 80 countries, mostly in sub-Saharan Africa, but also in Asia, the Pacific and South America. Cassava contains cyanogens, which protect against pests and predators by producing cyanide. So-called bitter varieties produce more...
  10. Some tropical crops contain cyanogenic glycosides, toxic substances that release hydrocyanic acid (HCN; also referred to as cyanide) when cells are crushed. Consuming these plants without cooking them can cause cyanide poisoning, with varying effects depending on cyanide levels and how long a...