The first common trait of good managers is that they have a system to organize their work. Systems range from very informal, such as a note pad with “to do” lists, to complex computer programs synchronized to a smartphone. The important feature of any such system is that it gives the manager a way to store and retrieve information outside of their head. The best of these systems not only store information, but provide a mechanism for prioritization and a means of reminding the manager about important time-sensitive tasks.

The next common trait is the ability to communicate clearly to the team the what, how, when and why of the tasks needing to be done. The more complex and/or sophisticated the task, the more thorough the explanation should be, and the more need there will be for additional written procedures to ensure that those charged with completing the task can enjoy success. The “why” component of communication is very important, and often overlooked. When team members know why a task is being done, they have a sense of purpose that often inspires them to creatively explore better ways of accomplishing that goal.

--  Brad Ward,  EDN #120

Please note that the links listed below may lead to additional resources which have not yet been added to this collection.


  1. 2012-12-20
  2. Rating: 4.0 - 1 Vote
    2013-07-20 This article will share ideas of how to put your written farm plan to work. It will start with a brief outline of some basic project management principles. Next, it will cover a simple system used by the author to implement his farm plan. Finally, it will describe the process of ongoing planning...
  3. 2015-02-03
  4. 2002-06-10 Amazon.com Description This book presents a comparative analysis of seven case studies that challenge some of the current beliefs about good practice in the provision of business development services (BDS) to small and micro enterprises. It also highlights issues around the assessment of impact,...
  5. 2005-01-20 Plans should be drawn up before any effort is wasted. Think through your traffic routes and flow of materials. Integrate your resource recovery plan in this process. Set your goals and lay down the steps that you think are needed as you see it now. Write it down; it will be a flexible starting...
  6. Rating: 5.0 - 1 Vote
    2013-01-20 It has been said that a goal without a plan is just a wish. Studies have shown that individuals with clear, written goals are significantly more likely to succeed than those without clearly defined goals. For example, a study conducted by Gail Matthews, Ph.D., at the Dominican University, found...
  7. Provided by Steve Hodges - African Agriculture Risk Management Services Within the internationally recognized field of agricultural risk assessment and management, risks can be evaluated according to three basic criteria : Impact: In other words, how severe will the risk event be if it actually...