1. 1995-06-19 Dave Morneauin the Central Plateau of Haiti asked us about the Haitian beekeepers’ belief that neem(Azadirachta indica) or chinaberry (Melia azedarach) blossom nectar is harmful to honeybees, since leaves and seeds are widely used to control insects. Joy Niland, Food Gardens Foundation, South...
  2. The tree spinach (Cnidoscolus chayamansaMcVaughn, Euphorbiaceae), called "chaya" in south Texas, is popular in Mexico and Central America and has been introduced into the United States (mainly South Texas and Florida) for potential uses as a leafy vegetable and/or as a medicinal plant. The plant...
  3. 2018-03-13 The purpose of this conference and consultation is to share the results of a value chain and marketing study recently undertaken in Guatemala on chaya (Cnidoscolus aconitifolius). The event will be also an opportunity for cross learning among key institutions working on chaya in Guatemala, Mexico...
  4. Key Resource
    2006-01-01 Dr. Martin Price, co-founder of ECHO and former head of ECHO’s Agricultural Resources Department, has said, “I would consider chaya to be one of the five most important underutilized food plants ECHO distributes. I give it this rank because of its ability to thrive in both arid and rainy regions,...
  5. 2018-10-17 Chaya (Cnidoscolus aconitifolius) or tree spinach is a nutritious, fast growing perennial shrub (TN 53). It is one of many food plants that contain cyanogens, chemical compounds that can produce toxic hydrogen cyanide (HCN) when the food is consumed (Table 1). Hydrogen cyanide is produced when...