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  1. 2001-07-20 Perennials that year after year incorporate atmospheric carbon dioxide into biomass, improve our environment, and give us useful food, feed and fuel are wonderful plants. Residents of West Africa have long recognized the African oil palm (Elaeis guineensis) as such a plant. There may be places...
  2. 2001-10-20 A few years ago (August, 1999), David Kennedy from Leaf for Life shared some experiences with drying leaves in Latin America.
  3. 2001-10-20 A booklet by Leaf for Life called “Drying Green Leaves in the Sun” has some helpful hints about drying leaves and what to do with the leaf powder.
  4. 2003-01-20 Chaya is sometimes dubbed "the spinach tree." It is a fast growing drought and disease-resistant shrub that provides large quantities of edible, very nutritious leaves.
  5. 1996-10-19 The atemoya is one of those fewfruits that can be considered a fully adequate dessert.
  6. 2003-01-20 In EDN Issue 72, we asked readers how chaya grows in various climates; whether or not it is accepted locally as a green vegetable; and if so, how it is usually prepared and served. Thank you to those of you who responded!We received reports from many different countries. Chaya has been found to...
  7. 2004-01-20 In a survey reported in the East African Medical Journal, 597 school children and their parents were surveyed in areas of southern Ethiopia that have very high incidence of goiter. M. stenopetala had a significant association with the prevalence of goiter.
  8. 2006-07-20 In EDN Issue 80 (July 2003), we asked for feedback from our network about raising soybeans in the tropics. We heard back from several people and would like to share their responses.
  9. 2007-01-20 Lagos spinach (Celosia argentea; a.k.a. quail grass, soko, celosia, feather cockscomb) is a low-maintenance broadleaf annual crop that will grow with minimal effort and resources. This underexploited leafy vegetable is easy to plant, grows in most climates and soils, withstands drought and heat,...
  10. 2007-10-20 Winged bean (Psophocarpus tetragonolobus), an amazingly productive and multi-purpose legume, grows as a vine typically staked on 1.5 to 2 m (5 to 6.5 ft) poles or trellises. Likely originating in the Asian tropics, it thrives in hot, humid areas and grows at elevations up to 2000 m (6562 ft).