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  1. Key Resource 1998-10-01 Third Edition People interested in tropical gardening or botany will find this an indispensable guide to several hundred species of plants with edible leaves. Leaves can provide high-quality food, and in the tropics, many are from perennials requiring little effort for their abundant production....
  2. 2020-04-14 Quarantines, preventative measures associated with disease outbreaks like COVID-19, limit people’s ability to go to markets and stores to get food. People may also find that they have extra time around the house to invest in gardening. During such times, household gardening gains importance for...
  3. 2011-01-20 This book explains how to grow, prepare, and preserve over 100 unique leaf vegetables. You'll learn how to make leaf concentrate, raise edible cover crops, and build your own solar food dryer, while exploring the potential role of leaf crops in ending global malnutrition and building a more...
  4. 2009-04-01 Indigenous (naturally occurring) and traditional (introduced in the past and incorporated into the culture) leafy vegetables are often greatly under-utilized. In many areas, the knowledge and use of indigenous leafy vegetables (ILVs) has declined as vegetables such as cabbage, tomatoes and...
  5. 2009-04-01 If you work in a country that is not your own, chances are you sometimes wonder about which crops to grow and promote. A good first step is to find out what is already being grown in-country. It will quickly become obvious what the staple grains are. Less apparent, and often greatly...
  6. 2014-10-15 Letter from the Editor A Low-Cost Concrete Ring Aquaponics System Lessons Learned from Cement Ring Aquaponics Systems in Northern Thailand Selections From the ECHO Asia Seed Bank Book Review: Edible Leaves of the Tropics
  7. Garland chrysanthemum is a leafy, annual herb that reaches a height of 90-120 cm by flowering time. The leaves add flavor to stir-fries, soups and salads and have a pleasing spicy, sweet, aromatic taste.
  8. 2018-07-18 Culantro (Eryngium foetidum) is often confused with, or substituted for, cilantro (Coriandrum sativum L.; also called coriander). Culantro is commonly used in chutneys, curries, soups, and meat and noodle dishes in Asia. Sofrito, a common spice mixture added to many recipes throughout Latin...