1. Key Resource 2016-02-05 Until recently, firewood was taken for granted in northern Thailand. With vast forests full of many types of trees, upland households could afford to be choosy concerning the wood they used for cooking. However, in recent years, more and more communities are facing restricted access to forest...
  2. This article is from ECHO Asia Note #7 Editor: Due to the length of this article, only a portion isincluded in ECHO Asia Notes. The full article, includingillustrated steps related to the assembly of 200- liter drumkilns as well as charcoal and wood vinegar production, canbe accessed via the web...
  3. Akvofoundation Demonstration on how to make charcoal briquettes, by Amy Smith of D-Lab, MIT (http://web.mit.edu/d-lab/). For more information, please contact charcoal@mit.edu. The charcoal is made from agricultural waste materials using an oil drum. In this case maize stalks were used. The...
  4. 1980-01-06 This guide describes how to operate a transportable charcoal kiln. The kiln is made from sheet metal and can be built by local craftsmen with a workshop which has basic welding, rolling, drilling, and cutting facilities. 18 pages, illustrations, photos
  5. 1985-01-12 This manual shows how the use of simple tools and techniques are applicable in small-scale operations in developing countries to provide fulewood and charcoal. 119 pages, illustrations
  6. 2019-04-26 Fever tree (Acacia xanthophloea) is a fast-growing, medium-size tree (reaching 15 to 25 m in height) with smooth, yellow-green bark. Thorns up to 7 cm long grow on the trunk and become more dense in the spreading branches. Fever tree can be found throughout Africa, most commonly in swampy,...
  7. Animation oyo ezali kolakisa lolenge ya ko sala pona ko filtrer mayi a partir ya makala na ko utiliser zelo. Ezali lolenge moko ya simple oyo ezo permettre ya kolongola ba salite to pe ba polluants ebele na kati, mais nionso te, ya mayi oyo ekoki ko causer ba mikakatano ya nzoto.
  8. The alternative to digging a pit is to stack the wood above the ground and cover the stack with earth. This method is also very old and is widely used in many countries. One finds many variations of the basic method. Studies have been made in some countries to optimise the design. The Swedish...
  9. Using earth as a shield against oxygen and to insulate the carbonising wood against excessive loss of heat is the oldest system of carbonization and surely goes back to the dawn of history. Even today it is perhaps used to make more charcoal than any other method. It is, therefore, worthy of...