1. From a foundation in the methods and success of biological control (Chapter 1), its implementation and cost (Chapter 2) and its probability of success (Chapter 3), we have developed in this chapter specific priorities for biological control programmes in the major crops of developing countries....
  2. Proper management of trees and forests is necessary to make resources sustainable. Trees ñ or rather: woody plants in general ñ play an important part in traditional farming systems in the tropics, not just as food and cash crops but also as suppliers of fuelwood and fodder. Farmers are also...
  3. The way we currently produce our food is damaging both to ourselves and our planet. There is therefore a need to create gardens, woodlands and farms which are in harmony with nature. Natural ecosystems are good models, but many of the plants they contain are not necessarily edible. What we need...
  4. The Square Foot Gardening Foundation has a brand new program aimed at developing countries. It's a self-help, grass roots operation that trains others how to have a very productive garden in a very small space.
  5. This text was written to give attention to the scientific, technological, and economic foundations of world crop production. The sciences dealing with plants and the technology and economics of crop production and marketing have become irrevocably entwined. This text was planned for use primarily...
  6. The book lists a number of plants with a culinary history and suggests new ones, not in the wilderness where recent interest has already resulted in numerous books, but in your own garden where you like to work, relax and entertain, where familiar plants can play exciting new roles. We have...
  7. 1976-01-19 Worldwide, more than 3,000 plant species have been used as food, only 300 of which are now widely grown, and only 12 of which furnish nearly 90 percent of the world's food. These 12 include the grains: rice, wheat, maize (corn), sorghums, millets, rye, and barley, and potatoes, sweet potatoes,...
  8. First issued in 1957 by Swallow Press, this classic guide to the art of plant identification is now familiar to an entire generation of students. Harrington who was Professor of Botany and Curator of the Herbarium at Colorado State University, gives step-by-step instructions and definitions to...
  9. Did you know that the Jerusalem cherry does not grow in or near Jerusalem? That the Spanish cedar is a native of the West Indies? That the French mulberry is neither French nor a mulberry? L. H. Bailey, in this basic introduction to botanical nomenclature, reveals the confusion that results from...
  10. Combines a field guide to finding and preserving medicinal plants with a detailed home advisor to their uses in cooking, cosmetics and health