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Agricultural and Nutritional Options for Impoverished People Living with HIV/AIDS

Advantages of Perennial Vegetables

Resources to Help with Haiti Disaster Response

Coppicing Woodlots

Books, Websites and Other Resources

Faidherbia albida, an Important 'Fertilizer Tree'

Learn two important lessons from the goat and the deer—diversify food options!

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Published

2010-04-01

Articles in this Issue

Agricultural and Nutritional Options for Impoverished People Living with HIV/AIDS

Dr. Martin Price

Many complicating factors affect agricultural work, family health, and nutrition when one or more family members are HIV positive or have an active case of AIDS. In addition to those who are sick, others in the family and community are affected by the consequences of their illness. This broader community is commonly referred to as People Living With HIV/AIDS (PLWHA).

 

Advantages of Perennial Vegetables

Dr. Martin Price

ECHO emphasizes the many benefits of growing perennial vegetables. By this we mean vegetables that are planted once and eaten from for years. The benefits are many and can be especially helpful to the families of PLWHA, who have diminished labor availability and perhaps less land and money to purchase seeds.

Resources to Help with Haiti Disaster Response

ECHO has considered how our resources can be most helpful in light of the recent devastating earthquake near Port Au Prince, Haiti. Our main strength is in the area of agricultural information relevant to development workers, project volunteers and church leaders working on behalf of those in need. Although ECHO does not specialize in relief, we anticipate that our resources will play a significant role in dealing with long-term recovery efforts.

Coppicing Woodlots

Jean Remy Azor, interviewed by Danny Blank

Jean Remy Azor owns and manages his own “ti fore” (little forest) in Haiti. He started it in 1984 and has not had to replant it since. He tells of his experiences with it.

Faidherbia albida, an important ‘Fertilizer Tree’

Bob Hargrave

Faidherbia albida exhibits reverse leaf phenology, losing its leaves at the beginning of the rainy season just as farmers want full sun for their crops. While most other species flower before or during the rains, the apple ring acacia flowers and leafs out at the end of the rainy season providing shade for animals, pods for food and blossoms for bees.

Learn two important lessons from the goat and the deer—diversify food options!

People will be rewarded by intentionally being browsers. By eating a wide variety of foods, we will be more likely to take in a sufficient daily amount of all that we need for good health. In contrast, cultures that, for example, eat mainly rice or tortillas or bread made from one kind of grain (and perhaps some legumes, if they can afford them) are much more likely to experience deficiencies in one or more nutrients.