1. Proceedings of a trilateral workshop involving the US, Australia, and New Zealand, held in Honolulu, July 1988. Contributors discuss the problem of poor persistence of forage legumes and define research priorities for its solution.
  2. 1998-05-01 A Project Report presented to Cornell University 43 pages
  3. 1995-03-19 Learning how to do experimental trials Intensive small-scale farming Understanding plant diseases Fertilizer bean-Honduras Rats, mice and other vermin Rural journalism Information sharing - Germany Flexible experiments Learning with urban farmers - Bolivia Less fertilzer Hybrid layers -...
  4. The purpose of this monograph was to:-(a) Review the benefits derived from planting tree legumes; (b) consider which species are important for forage; (c) analyse the important issues in improvement, management and use, (d) review the level of uptake and commercial potential of forage tree legume...
  5. 1987-01-01 This volume on sesbania, a member of the legume family, brings together research and combines it with previous studies and an extensive review of the literature. Sesbania occurs both in annual and perennial forms in tropical an subtropical regions and is adaptable in a wide variety of soil...
  6. 2002-01-01 This Agrodok is based on a previous shorter edition, Soya. The text has been extended to include more practical information on growing and processing soya and other legumes into nutritious food products. We have included other legumes so that the information in the book will be useful in more...
  7. Edible portion: Seeds, Nut, Leaves, Vegetable A deciduous tree up to 7-20 m high. It spreads to 4 m across. It loses many of its leaves during the hot dry season of the year. The stem is erect and slender. The bark is smooth and light brown. The leaves are green and divided twice into leaflets....
  8. 1987-05-19 Integrated nutrient supply Improved fallow Nitrogen transfer from legumes Cover crops on acid soils Sunnhemp Rock phosphate Micro-nutrient drain Soil conservation and shifting cultivators Cycles of poverty
  9. 1985-01-01 The two groups of plants of greatest importance to world agriculture are grasses (such as maize, wheat, rice, sorghum, pearl millet, sugar cane, and forage grasses) and legumes (such as peas, beans, soybeans, alfalfa, clovers, cowpeas). Legumes are extremely important because of the high...
  10. 1995-12-19 Coping with change in dryland savannah Sustainable agriculture in different environments Food security Watershed development in India through peoples participation Nutrientdynamics and agricultural intensification - Nigeria Legumes for sustainable food production Legumes Farmers in Argentina...