SALT is a package technology of soil conservation and food production, integrating differing soil conservation measures in just one setting. Basically, SALT is a method of growing field and permanent crops in 3-5 m wide bands between contoured rows of nitrogen fixing trees. The nitrogen fixing trees are thickly planted in double rows to make hedgerows. When a hedge is 1.5-2 m tall, it is cut down to about 75 cm and the cuttings (tops) are placed in the alleyways to serve as organic fertilizer.

SALT, An Agroforestry Scheme: SALT is a diversified farming system which can be considered agroforestry since rows of permanent shrubs like coffee, cacao, citrus and other fruit trees are dispersed throughout the farm plot. The strips not occupied by permanent crops, however, are planted alternately to cereals (corn, upland rice, sorghum, etc.) or other crops (sweet potato, melon, pineapple, castor bean, etc.) and legumes (soybean, mung bean, peanut, etc.). This cyclical cropping provides the farmer some harvest throughout the year. SALT also includes the planting of trees for timber and firewood on surrounding boundaries. Examples of tree species for “boundary forest” in SALT are mahogany, Cassuarina, Sesbania, Cashew, etc.

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  1. Key Resource
    2012-01-01 Asia makes up less than one third (30%) of the world’s land area and yet carries over half (56%) of the world’s population. Moreover, the average population density of Asia becomes a significant long-term problem when food production is considered. Some countries in Asia have a population density...
  2. 2008-07-20 This method is designed to allow crops to be grown even onsteep hillsides with minimal erosion while at the same timeincreasing soil fertility and providing fodder for livestock.Rather than controlling erosion with rock terraces or ditches, SALT relies on rows of vegetation.
  3. ICIMOD believes in a future where the region’s mountain people can experience enhanced livelihoods, equity, and social and environmental security; where they can adapt to climate, environmental, and socioeconomic change; and where future generations of mountain and downstream populations can...
  4. The overall mission ofMountain Research and Developmentis to foster sustainable development in mountains by supporting peer-reviewed interdisciplinary, disciplinary, and transdisciplinary research on mountains, developing scientific capacity, capitalizing on development experiences, promoting...
  5. AccessAgriculture Training Video On sloping land, rainwater washes away the fertile soil and cassava yields will quickly decline. By reducing soil erosion and building up a healthy soil, you will continue to have a good cassava harvest for many years. English French Khmer Lao Thai Vietnamese
  6. 2017-10-03 In this workshop, I will describe and diagram the common sloping land corn and rice farming system. I will then identify leverage points within the system and how development workers can work with farmers to make these systems more sustainable.
  7. Experimental Agriculture Croft, M., Bicksler, A., Manson, J., & Burnette, R. (2013). COMPARISON OF APPROPRIATE TROPICAL SEED STORAGE TECHNIQUES FOR GERMPLASM CONSERVATION IN MOUNTAINOUS SUB-TROPICAL CLIMATES WITH RESOURCE CONSTRAINTS. Experimental Agriculture, 49(02), 279-294. Summary...
  8. Abstract, 1998, Food and Fertilizer Technology Center Increasing population growth and limited resources present a challenge to the development of Asia, especially in the impoverished uplands. The people living in the slopelands of Asia are generally plagued by poverty and constant soil erosion,...
  9. 1995-12-01 Mountain agriculture has attracted attention both for its complex adaptation to particular circumstances, and for its marginality and instability in a changing world. Irrigation plays a range of roles in mountain farming systems and their dynamics or change. Hill Irrigation examines the...
  10. 2011-02-01 Volume 3 takes the subject of better land husbandry further. The book first points out the sort of things which have been, and are being used, but are failing to deliver what is required. It then explains the causes of erosion, the theory and practice of soil and water conservation, and practical...
  11. Abstract,The Solutions Journal, 2016 As previously stated, terraces are an obvious solution for agriculture in high declivity terrain. However, they also offer much more than just being soil and water retainers. A controlled height allows for greater soil depth than the natural environment could...
  12. AccessAgriculture Training Video Contour hedgerows slow the speed of water coming down the slope and allow the water to infiltrate. They also allow the washed away soil and nutrients to settle out above the hedgerows. You can plant many different grasses, depending on what you need and what is...
  13. AccessAgriculture Training Video Fanya juu means "throw the soil up" in Kiswahili. The terraces formed are ideal for fodder grasses and help prevent soil erosion. Cultivation becomes easier as the terraces spread out to make the land more level and when combined with manure/fertilizer yields...
  14. Abstract, SCAPE, Terracing is one of the oldest means of saving soil and water. The objective of this paper is to provide information on the different types of terraces and their functioning, and to describe advantages and disadvantages of terraces regarding their efficacy to stop or reduce soil...
  15. Abstract, 2009 At the Visayas State College of Agriculture (ViSCA) on the island of Leyte in the Philippines, hydrologic and soil-loss measurements were recorded for 32 erosion events over 3 yr on three 12-m-long bare soil plots with slopes of approximately 50%, 60%, and 70%. Measurements...
  16. Abstract, Frontiers in Plant Science, 2017 Improving land productivity is essential to meet increasing food and forage demands in hillside and mountain communities. Tens of millions of smallholder terrace farmers in Asia, Africa, and Latin America who earn $1–2 per day do not have access to...
  17. 2019-02-13 Session: The presenter will describe the use of terraces to control soil erosion and increase land availability for agriculture in the DRC. Biographical information: Filbert Leone Ahmat works for FHI in the Democratic Republic of the Congo