Micro-Scale Water Harvesting

Fly Control for Cattle

Additional Comments About Cashew

Performance of Jack Bean Seed that ECHO Sent Us.

The Papaya Seed Stomach Cure


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Performance of Jack Bean Seed that ECHO Sent Us.

Dave Crist

This is a good example of how quickly seeds can multiply.

“Of the 8 seeds that were sent 4 were planted in a place where sunlight was restricted to about 4 hours a day. These gave very few pods. The 4 others got more sunlight and we got a harvest of 185 seeds so far. We have planted 160 of these seeds at our demonstration site and they are growing vigorously. With this second harvest we hope to promote the use of jack beans among the farmers who have infertile plots of land.”

Fly Control for Cattle

Darrell Cox

Horn flies have been controlled with insecticides in the U.S. since the early 1950s. An alternative, mechanical means of control (horn fly trap) was developed prior to World War II, but this never made its way into mainstream agriculture because of the growing use of pesticides following the war. The horn fly trap is now being promoted as an effective means of controlling not only horn flies, but also stable flies, face flies and house flies.

Additional Comments About Cashew

Brian Hilton

In the last issue Brian Hilton shared his experience with cashew trees in Mozambique. For this issue we asked Brian to expand on some of the issues raised there. Then we follow with a letter that Ian Wallace in Guinea-Bissau wrote us seven years ago about some of the problems with the cashew work there. It confirms some of the warnings that Brian raised in the last issue.

The Papaya Seed Stomach Cure

Jim Ardill

Papaya seeds are part of traditional Ethiopian medicine for stomach worms.

Micro-Scale Water Harvesting

Roland Bunch

Three programs in Honduras have been looking for ways that poor hillside farmers can capture rainwater in their own fields and hold it there for two or three months. This water could then be used for supplemental irrigation during droughts or for extending the cropping season into the dry season.