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In the 19th century, a German botanist at the University of Wurzburg, Julius Sachs, dedicated his career to understanding the essential elements that plants need to survive. By examining differences between plants grown in soil and those grown in water, Sachs found that plants did not need to grow in soil but only needed the nutrients that are derived from microorganisms that live in the soil. In 1860, Sachs published the “nutrient solution” formula for growing plants in water, which set the foundation for modern day hydroponic technology.

---   Harvard University blog



  1. Abstract, Frontiers in Plant Science, 2019 Soilless cultivation represent a valid opportunity for the agricultural production sector, especially in areas characterized by severe soil degradation and limited water availability. Furthermore, this agronomic practice embodies a favorable response...
  2. Abstract, ACTA Scientific Agriculture, 2019 Horizontal agriculture is confronting with major challenges and the most importantly, decrease in per capita land availability as well as agricultural production. In addition to this, the two dimensional traditional farming is unable to meet the food...
  3. Syrian refugees at Zaatari camp in Jordan and scientists from the University of Sheffield are working together to create a way to grow healthy, fresh food with nothing but water and old mattress foam. These 'recycled gardens' use the mattresses in place of the soil, which solves two problems in...
  4. Abstract,Agronomy for Sustainable Development, Springer Verlag/EDP Sciences/INRA, 2017 Over the last three decades, urban agriculture has been improving food security in Cuba by providing fresh vegetables within and on the outskirts of cities and villages. However, organic fertilizers and...
  5. In the 19thcentury, a German botanist at the University of Wurzburg,Julius Sachs, dedicated his career to understanding the essential elements that plants need to survive. By examining differences between plants grown in soil and those grown in water, Sachs found that plants did not need to grow...
  6. Securing Water for Food: A Grand Challenge for Development helps farmers around the world grow more food using less water, enhance water storage, and improve the use of saline water and soil to produce food by ensuring that the entrepreneurs and scientists behind groundbreaking new approaches are...
  7. Peggy Bradley The first class in a series of videos on Micro-Gardens. How to grow your own food on a 100 by 50 foot lot
  8. Abstract,Journal of Soil and Water Conservation, 2018 Currently hydroponic cultivation is gaining popularity all over the world because of efficient resources management and quality food production. Soil based agriculture is now facing various challenges such as urbanization, natural disaster,...
  9. Peggy Bradley A class on using small containers in a micro-garden. This shows using recycled materials to help construct a garden at home
  10. Peggy Bradley This is Class 3 in the Micro-gardens Class. It discusses making larger garden containers out of shipping pallets and sheets of black plastic.
  11. Peggy Bradley This is the fourth class in the Micro-gardens Class. It discusses hydroponic substrates that can replace soil.
  12. Peggy Bradley Class 5 of the Micro-Gardens Class on using mineral hydroponic nutrient.
  13. Peggy Bradley This class shows the organoponics movement in Cuba where 60% of their food is grown this way. Shows how to set up one in your own yard.
  14. Peggy Bradley This is class 7 in the Micro-garden Training and concerns controlling pests with natural means.
  15. Peggy Bradley This class shows different things that can be used instead of soil to grow plants. It is part of a micro-gardens Class to grow your own food on 100 by 50 foot lot.
  16. Peggy Bradley This is the ninth and final class in the Micro-gardens Course. It discusses products other than food that can be grown with hydroponics.
  17. AccessAgriculture Training Video Saving water, minimum land use, less labour, faster growth, giving a high yield of highly nourishing fodder that will improve your livestock. These are the key benefits in hydroponic fodder production. BanglaEnglishFrenchHindiMarathi