1. The key difference between regenerative agriculture and sustainable agriculture is the intention to regenerate, or renew, the productivity and growth potential of whatever is being regenerated. Sustainable practices, by definition, seek to maintain the same, whereas regenerative practices...
  2. What is regenerative agriculture? Why is it different fromsustainable agriculture? And how do I reconcile what practitioners of this system are claiming with the scientific evidence?
  3. 2019-10-01 This two part session will give an overview of what regenerative agriculture is, using case studies of the potential for regenerative agriculture to heal ecosystems and sequester carbon, while producing food. A quickly growing movement in both the Global North and the Global South, regenerative...
  4. 2019-11-26 Session: With increasing threat of climate crisis, soil loss, and continued economic challenges to farmers, building extremely robust and healthy soils provides the whole systems approach that is affordable and immediately available to all farmers. At its premise it is biologically based using...
  5. Session: With increasing threat of climate crisis, soil loss, and continued economic challenges to farmers, building extremely robust and healthy soils provides the whole systems approach that is affordable and immediately available to all farmers. At its premise it is biologically based using...
  6. Conventional wisdom has long held that the world cannot be fed without chemicals and synthetic fertilizers. Evidence points to a new wisdom: The world cannot be fed unless the soil is fed. Regenerative agriculture enhances and sustains the health of the soil by restoring its carbon content, which...
  7. Abstract,Basic and Applied Ecology, 2019 Agroecosystems represent a large geographical footprint in most terrestrial landscapes, and management decisions within these systems affect their function in species conservation. We evaluated the effects that rangeland management systems (based on...
  8. Abstract, Nature Communications, 2019 Increasing the potential of soil to store carbon (C) is an acknowledged and emphasized strategy for capturing atmospheric CO2. Well-recognized approaches for soil C accretion include reducing soil disturbance, increasing plant biomass inputs, and enhancing...
  9. Abstract,Agriculture, Ecosystems & Environment, 2018 Global crop yield gains have not be associated with increases in the many macro- and micro-nutrients needed for a balanced human diet. There is thus growing interest in improving agricultural practices to increase nutrient availability to...
  10. Mission The Center for Regenerative Agriculture and Resilient Systems (CRARS) aims to investigate, develop, demonstrate, and educate about comprehensive, regenerative practices that both restore and enhance the resiliency of living systems. Why this work is important? As a society, we have...
  11. Abstract, Agronomy, 2019 Phosphorus is an essential macronutrient required for plant growth and development. It is central to many biological processes, including nucleic acid synthesis, respiration, and enzymatic activity. However, the strong adsorption of phosphorus by minerals in the soil...
  12. The Savory Institute develops innovative tools and curricula, informs policy, establishes market incentives, increases public awareness, and coordinates research: cultivating relationships with aligned partners.
  13. The Land Institute is a 501(c)(3) non-profit organization based in Salina, Kansas, that was founded in 1976. The Land Institute’s work, led by ateam of plant breeders and ecologistsinmultiple partnerships worldwide, is focused on developing perennial grains, pulses and oilseed bearing plants to...
  14. Abstract, Nature Communication, 2019 The soil microbiome is highly diverse and comprises up to one quarter of Earth’s diversity. Yet, how such a diverse and functionally complex microbiome influences ecosystem functioning remains unclear. Here we manipulated the soil microbiome in experimental...
  15. The Johnson-Su Bioreactor method of creating compost is quite different from other composting methods in several respects. The most common commercial windrow composting processes are usually designed and operated for speed and maximum product flow. Unfortunately, this focus does not allow the...
  16. Abstract, Frontiers in Microbiology, 2016 Despite several lines of observational evidence, there is a lack of consensus on whether higher fungal:bacterial (F:B) ratios directly cause higher soil carbon (C) storage. We employed RNA sequencing, protein profiling and isotope tracer techniques to...
  17. Healthy soil is teaming with life in the form of billions of microscopic soil organisms. A teaspoon of healthy soil can contain more soil microorganisms than there are people on earth. The soil microorganisms found in healthy, or “living soil,” have important functions including converting...