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S. asiatica is a hemiparasitic plant, native to Africa and Asia. In common with most other parasitic weeds, it is not especially invasive in natural vegetation, but is much feared in crop land where infestations can build up to ruinous levels, especially with repeated growing of susceptible cereal crops. For this reason it is included in almost all lists of noxious, prohibited plant species. It has recently been reported in Queensland, Australia. There is also evidence for its continuing spread and intensification within a number of countries in Africa in particular in rice in Tanzania and maize in Malawi. A study by Mohamed et al. (2006) suggests that on the basis of climatic data, there are many territories into which Striga species, including S. asiatica, could be introduced and thrive. Global warming could further increase this potential.   --- CABI



  1. 1996-01-19 The parasiticweed Striga hermonthica is a major problem in African millet fields. International Agricultural Development (Jan/Feb 1994) reports that dense intercropping of cowpea in millet stands can reduce Striga emergence.
  2. Access Agriculture Training Video During weekly visits, and supported by their extension agent, a farmer field school in Tanzania learns how to test different sorghum varieties for striga resistance and evaluate how each one performs under different practices. Available languages Amharic Arabic...
  3. S. asiaticais a hemiparasitic plant, native to Africa and Asia. In common with most other parasitic weeds, it is not especially invasive in natural vegetation, but is much feared in crop land where infestations can build up to ruinous levels, especially with repeated growing of susceptible cereal...
  4. In the Push-Pull system, crops that repel pests and/or attract pests’ predators are intercropped with maize, to ‘push’ pests away from the main crop. Plants that attract pests are planted around the field, to ‘pull’ pests away from the maize. Incorporating legumes in this system means that soil...
  5. 2018-08-08 Session: African Witchweeds and Their Relatives—Biology, Sanitation, and Control Biographical Information: Lytton John Musselman is Mary Payne Hogan Distinguished Professor of Botany at Old Dominion University and has researched Striga as a Fulbright Professor at the University of Khartoum; as a...
  6. 'Striga-resistant', developed at Purdue University, is resistant to the parasitic weed Striga, and produces good grain for feed on plants about 1.25 m tall.
  7. Access Agriculture Training Video It is important to pull striga weeds with your hands before the time it produces seeds and spreads. As it is laborious, better reduce the number of striga plants by applying compost or manure, and by rotating or intercropping with non-cereal crops, such as...
  8. Access Agriculture Training Video Compost is more powerful than manure. What is less known is that the micro-organisms in compost attack striga seeds in the soil. Compost also decreases the amount of striga that will sprout, and reduces its negative effect on cereal crops. Let us look at how...
  9. Access Agriculture Training Video One of the major parasites is striga, a weed that sucks the juice and nutrients from cereal crops such as millet, sorghum and maize and causes great yield losses. A single striga plant can produce hundreds of thousands of seeds. The seeds are so tiny that most...
  10. Access Agriculture Training Video The parasitic weed striga causes more damage to cereal crops in poor soils, so both problems have to be tackled together. In this video we will learn why it is important to combine at least three control methods to reduce striga and obtain a good yield of...
  11. Abstract, Sustainable Agriculture Research, 2018 This paper assesses the climate smart agricultural practices triggered by learning videos on integrated striga management, soil fertility and cost-benefit evaluation practices. Using household head interviews and focus group discussions, this study...
  12. 1998-02-19 A striga resistant sorghum has been developed. In addition the fungus, Fusarium oxysporum, may help control striga.

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