Aflatoxin in the Diet Makes the Progression of HIV/AIDS and Hepatitis Much Worse

How Can a Diet Rich in Phosphorus Lead to Phosphorus Deficiency and Other Deficiencies?

Effect of Neem Leaf Extract on N-Fixing in Beans

Artemisia in the News Again

Baobab Gardens for "Leaf Production

Indigenous Leafy Vegetables


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Baobab Gardens for Leaf Production

Dawn Berkelaar

Indigenous (naturally occurring) and traditional (introduced in the past and incorporated into the culture) leafy vegetables are often greatly under-utilized. In many areas, the knowledge and use of indigenous leafy vegetables (ILVs) has declined as vegetables such as cabbage, tomatoes and carrots have gained prominence. 

Baobab (Adansonia digitata) leaves are also a kind of indigenous leafy vegetable. They are a staple food in the Sahel of West Africa. Baobab leaves are nutritious (particularly high in vitamin A) and are eaten almost daily in sauces.

Effect of Neem Leaf Extract on N-Fixing in Beans

Larry Yarger

 In a recent publication of the Journal of Agronomy for Sustainable Development, researchers (Montes-Molina et al) found that the antibacterial properties of neem (Azadirachta indica) leaf extract significantly lower the soil population of the bacterium Rhizobium spp. in plantings of beans (Phaseolus vulgaris). 

Artemisia is in the News Again

Martin Price, Ph.D.

In EDN 95, ECHO discussed how to grow and use leaves of artemisia as part of malaria treatment by those who have no access to commercial drugs. East African farmers have now become key suppliers of artemisia leaves for the pharmaceutical industry.
According to the New York Times, “The parasite that causes the deadliest form of malaria is showing the first signs of resistance to the best new drug [artemisinin] against it”

Aflatoxin in the Diet Makes the Progression of HIV/AIDS and Hepatitis Much Worse

Martin Price, Ph.D.

In many developing countries, there is no or little governmental regulation of and inspection for aflatoxin in foods and feeds. Even if there is governmental control in food processing, there is no oversight of food sold in markets or consumed right on the farm. The result is that humans are exposed to levels of aflatoxin in food that are as high as or higher than that to which animals are exposed in feed.

How Can a Diet Rich in Phosphorus Lead to Phosphorus Deficiency and Other Deficiencies?

Dawn Berkelaar

Phosphorus in the hulls of plant seeds, especially legumes and grains, is bound up in an organic molecule called phytic acid. In addition to the bound phosphorus, phytic acid can interrupt the body’s ability to utilize minerals found in food. Unless the phytic acid molecule is broken down, either before or during digestion, the phosphorus will be unavailable to the body.

 

 

Indigenous Leafy Vegetables

Tim Motis, PhD

If you work in a country that is not your own, chances are you sometimes wonder about which crops to grow and promote. A good first step is to find out what is already being grown in-country. It will quickly become obvious what the staple grains are. Less apparent, and often greatly under-utilized, are indigenous (naturally occurring) and traditional (introduced in the past and incorporated into the culture) leafy vegetables.

In many areas, the knowledge and use of indigenous leafy vegetables (ILVs) has declined as vegetables such as cabbage, tomatoes and carrots have gained prominence. In recent years, however, organizations such as the Asian Vegetable Research and Development Center (AVRDC), Bioversity International, and Fam Concern International have been influential in promoting ILVs. Consequently, there may well be growing interest in and new opportunities to market ILVs. Resource-poor farmers can easily grow ILVs, as these plants are well-suited to local conditions and thrive with minimal inputs (e.g. water and fertilizer). Moreover, ILVs are important sources of vitamins A and C, iron and other nutrients. They are readily incorporated as supplements to carbohydrate-based staples.