Moringa Information from 2006 International Moringa Workshop

Income and Other Benefits from Using Worms to Make Compost

Introducing a New Crop: Reasons Why Seeds Fail

Cowpea (Vigna unguiculata) Variety Trial at ECHO

 


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Moringa Information from 2006 International Moringa Workshop

In 2006, Beth Doerr attended an International Moringa Workshop in Accra, Ghana. Here are some of the key findings about moringa that were shared at the workshop.

Introducing a New Crop: Reasons Why Seeds Fail

Tim Motis

Many of you have graciously taken the time to fill out the seed harvest report form that accompanies each mailing of seeds from our seed bank. In reading reports from people in our network, we want to learn whether the seeds we are sending out have improved the lives of poor small-holder farmers. Looking at seed harvest reports dating back to 2000, I found that there seemed to be more reports of failure than success. Why would that be the case? Part of the answer is inherent in experimentation. One must be prepared to evaluate many crops/varieties before identifying a few winners. You may have heard it said that there is no such thing as a “failed” experiment, as knowledge is gained and lessons are learned whatever the results.

Cowpea (Vigna unguiculata) Variety Trial at ECHO

Eric Weber, Dr. Tim Motis, and Danny Blank

Grain legumes can be a tremendously important tool in combating malnutrition. The term “grain legume” or “pulse crop” is used for leguminous crops (e.g. cowpea, beans, peanut), the seeds of which are harvested dry and then cooked in various ways or made into flour. Being legumes, they provide a rich source of protein as well as vitamins, minerals and energy. According to Lost Crops of Africa (Volume II: Vegetables), cowpea (Vigna unguiculata) is the second-most planted grain legume on the continent of Africa. Yet, it is being “lost” in the sense that efforts to maximize its potential to increase nutrition are often lacking.

Income and Other Benefits from Using Worms to Make Compost

Dawn Berkelaar

Worms can be a lucrative and,beneficial addition to a small-scale farming operation. Several times in recent issues of EDN we have mentioned the value of compost. Here we report on the rapid production of compost using worms. Worm-produced compost, also called vermicompost, can be used in gardens and on agricultural land. The worms themselves can be used as a high-protein chicken feed or given or sold to others so they can begin worm composting themselves.