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EDN #153 Now Available 2021-10-04

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Moringa Productivity with Legume Intercropping

Tim Motis

Excerpt:

People often ask how much leaf powder to expect from their moringa trees. Table 1 shows the sum of our two harvests during each year. During the second year after seeding, with no legumes, the moringa trees produced a total of 76 g/tree of leaf powder, the equivalent of 255 kg/ha. That means that, during a second year after seeding, 1 ha of a moringa planting like ours can produce a year’s worth of leaf powder for 139 people consuming 5 g of powder per day. Witt (2013) provides the nutritional content for 5 g (15 mL or 1 tablespoon by volume) of moringa powder, an amount described as a realistic serving size. 

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Fill It Full: A Simple Way to Reduce Weevil Damage in Maize Seed Stored in Airtight Containers 2021-09-27

Postharvest losses inflicted by insect pests in stored grains represent major challenge smallholder famers face in the global South. The maize weevil (Sitophilus zeamais) is one of the most important postharvest pests in maize. With dry maize stored in woven polypropylene bags, Likhayo et al. (2018) found that insect pests (maize weevils and another maize pest called the lesser grain borer [Prostephanus truncatus]) reduced grain weight by 36%. Such losses threaten farmers’ food security and overall financial stability.

East Africa  

Jisajili sasa kwa ajili ya Kongamano la ECHO Afrika Mashariki 2021-08-17

Kongamano la Kilimo Endelevu na Teknolojia mbadala

septemba 28-30 2021

Kwenye mtandao

Jisajili leo!

Kuangalia ratiba ya tukio

EDN #152 Now Available 2021-07-22

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Insect Pest Management: Options for Controlling Pest Populations

Stacy Swartz

Excerpt:

Mechanical interventions for pest control are generally categorized as passive or active. Passive options include films, dusts, oils, soaps, and traps. Films such as kaolin clay can deter insects from landing on plants and/or deter feeding behaviors, but such films need to be reapplied as the plant generates new growth. Dusts such as diatomaceous earth can be placed around the base of plants to keep crawling pests from accessing the plant. Dusts can also be placed on the leaves as a feeding deterrent. Oils and soaps that kill pests are physical controls because their effect is short-term, and they act physically on the pest by smothering them or breaking down sensitive exterior tissues. Oils and soaps must contact pests and are most effective against soft-bellied insects such as aphids, mealybugs, whiteflies, spider mites, and scales. Repeated application is often required to control a population because oils and soaps are most effective at controlling young individuals. 

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EDN #152 Now Available 2021-07-06

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Insect Pest Management: Options for Controlling Pest Populations

Stacy Swartz

Excerpt:

Mechanical interventions for pest control are generally categorized as passive or active. Passive options include films, dusts, oils, soaps, and traps. Films such as kaolin clay can deter insects from landing on plants and/or deter feeding behaviors, but such films need to be reapplied as the plant generates new growth. Dusts such as diatomaceous earth can be placed around the base of plants to keep crawling pests from accessing the plant. Dusts can also be placed on the leaves as a feeding deterrent. Oils and soaps that kill pests are physical controls because their effect is short-term, and they act physically on the pest by smothering them or breaking down sensitive exterior tissues. Oils and soaps must contact pests and are most effective against soft-bellied insects such as aphids, mealybugs, whiteflies, spider mites, and scales. Repeated application is often required to control a population because oils and soaps are most effective at controlling young individuals. 

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Asia Note #46 Now Available 2021-06-14

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East Africa Note 7 Now Available 2021-04-21

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Packed Biogas in Bags: a research project

Harold Msanya

Excerpt:

Evelyn Mguo’s family is a consumer of bagged biogas who participated in phase one of the research project –‘Peer to peer’, a business model to test the viability of retailing methane gas in portable bags, from the farm gate of a biogas digester owner for distribution/sale to a  neighbor. Evelyn says, 

Both charcoal and firewood are difficult to access during the rainy season. I rarely use charcoal and firewood to cook local foods such as Makukuru and Ndizi. I grew up in a family that used firewood as the only source of energy and hence I used to believe that certain local foods taste better if they are cooked using firewood. I have now used the bagged biogas for three weeks and in my opinion it is a good option. I have managed to cook all types of foods that I used to cook using LPG. One (1m³) bag lasts 3 to 4 days and if it can be obtained for Tsh 2,000 per bag, it means I will cut down the cost used for LPG and other sources by almost 50%. My only request is for the project team think about how to package it in larger quantities so that it can last longer for at least seven days or more.

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Announcing the ECHO East Africa Symposium on Sustainable Agriculture and Appropriate Technology 2021-04-14

28th-30th September 2021

You are cordially invited to join us for the 6th ECHO East Africa Biennial Symposium on Sustainable Agriculture and Appropriate Technologies 2021. We hope that you will make time to gather online with us at this very important and effective event for learning, information sharing, and networking for those working and serving in the East Africa Region. Participants are encouraged to register online for a $20 registration fee and that we welcome donations from good-willed individuals to help those who cannot pay this fee.

EDN #151 Now Available 2021-04-07

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Insect Pest Management

Annie Deutsch and Stacy Swartz

Excerpt:

You can accomplish active sampling in a variety of ways. Sweep netting is one way to estimate an insect population throughout an entire field. To construct a basic sweep net from local materials, take a light-colored cloth sack, add a firm wire ring around the opening (30 to 38 cm diameter), and attach it to a stick or pole. Sweep nets work best for low-lying crops such as rice and other small grains, or non-vining beans before they flower and fruit—plants that are tough enough to handle the damage without losing fruit or too much leaf mass. Sweep nets also work best for insects that dislodge easily from the plants.

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