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Recruiting wild halophytes with economic potential was suggested several decades ago as a way to reduce the damage caused by salinization of soil and water. A range of cultivation systems for the utilization of halophytes have been developed, for the production of biofuel, purification of saline effluent in constructed wetlands, landscaping, cultivation of gourmet vegetables, and more. This review critically analyses past and present halophyte-based production systems in the context of genetics, physiology, agrotechnical issues and product value. There are still difficulties that need to be overcome, such as direct germination in saline conditions or genotype selection. However, more and more research is being directed not only towards determining salt tolerance of halophytes, but also to the improvement of agricultural traits for long-term progress.

-- Annals of Botany



  1. In recent years, salinity has become the most important issue in fields, gardens and greenhouses as well. This, of course, has forced us to control saline areas, and therefore, many control mechanisms that have been put forward. Many of them (genetics, biochemical and physical) have not brought...
  2. Halophytesare salt-tolerant plants that are found throughout the world. Halophytes can be used to grow both fuel and food, and a NASA facility is attempting to use halophytes for large-scale fuel production. The aim is to create aviation-grade biofuels without using any arable land, freshwater,...
  3. Abstract, 2017, Turkish Journal of Agriculture and Forestry Salt-induced land degradation has gradually increased in several major irrigation schemes within arid and semiarid regions. To maximize crop productivity under saline conditions, either salt tolerance crops should be cultivated or areas...
  4. Key Resource 1990-01-01 The agricultural use of saline water or soils can benefit many developing countries. Salt-tolerant plants can utilize land and water unsuitable for salt-sensitive crops (glycophytes) for the economic production of food, fodder, fuel, and other products. Halophytes (plants that grow in soils or...
  5. Abstract, 2018, Sustainability Saline irrigation water can lead to salt buildup and reduced crop yields. Halophytic plants are known to accumulate excess salts in tissues, removing them from the immediate environment. This two-phase experiment explored the feasibility of intercropping watermelon...
  6. Abstract, Annals of Botany, 2014 Recruiting wild halophytes with economic potential was suggested several decades ago as a way to reduce the damage caused by salinization of soil and water. A range of cultivation systems for the utilization of halophytes have been developed, for the production of...
  7. Abstract,Aquaculture Reports, 2017 Freshwater shortages are increasingly limiting both irrigated and rainfed agriculture. To expand possibilities for controlled plant production without using land nor freshwater, we cultivated potted halophytes floating at sea that were provided with rain- and...
  8. 2006-01-01 This handbook provides a simple identification guide to 125 wild and cultivated plant species in the United Arab Emirate, both common plants and rare ones. These plants are illustrated in color and described in detail to help naturalists, agriculturalist and scientists make positive...

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