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The reason for scarcity of fruits in regions where, by climatic indications, one would expect them to be most abundant, is not to be found in any single fact, but is, perhaps, largely the result of three causes: first, the enervating effect of heat, which discourages man from undertaking work which can be avoided; second, the one-sided exploitation of many tropical regions for the production of materials such as rubber and cotton, without sufficient regard to supplying wholesome foodstuffs for those who labor in producing these articles; and third, the long time required by tree-fruits to yield returns, as compared with the annual crops such as corn, beans, and squashes.  This last factor is particularly disastrous where people devote their attention in the main to crops which give quick returns,  - the very crops which must depend absolutely on the season's rainfall.    2 Copies

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Publication Details

  • Published: 1920
  • Publisher: The MacMillan Company
  • Dewey Decimal: 634.4
  • ECHO Library: 634.4 POP

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