Sort: Relevance | Newest first | Oldest first


396 items found (Showing 1 - 10)
  1. Originating in the Americas and Europe, amaranth has been cultivated for more than 8,000 years, dating back at least to the Mayan civilization of South and Central America. It was a staple of the Aztecs and incorporated into their religious ceremonies. In the 1500’s the Spanish conquistadors...  
  2. Vegetable amaranths are mostly erect, annual plants, and are collected from the wild or cultivated in hot humid regions of Africa, Asia, and the Caribbean. Several species of Amaranthus are grown for their protein-rich leaves and plant tops. The seeds of vegetable amaranths may be eaten but grain...  
  3. Grain amaranths are annual plants and include several species of Amaranthus grown specifically for the seeds which are usually lighter colored than vegetable amaranth varieties. The cultivation of grain amaranths as food plants is traceable to ancient Aztec civilizations of Mexico. The grain...  
  4. Key Resource 1983-01-01 Amaranth [Amaranthus hypochondriacus, A. cruentus(grain type) &A. tricolor(vegetable type)] is an herbaceous annual with upright growth habit, cultivated for both its seeds which are used as a grain and its leaves which are used as a vegetable or green. Both leaves and seeds contain protein...  
  5. 2006-04-20 This exceptionally nutritious, high protein grain, that requires less rainfall than corn, has potential as a staple for the general population plus seems to offer special value in managing diseases such as HIV/AIDS.The Amaranth family contains more than 60 species (most of them wild) and...  
  6. 1982-10-19 Amaranth grain, corn and beans were probably the primary foods of the Aztecs. The Aztecs unfortunately practiced a religious observance in which they world mix blood from a human sacrifice with popped amaranth grain. They formed this into a statue of a war god, worshiped the statue, then ate it....  
  7. 2015-10-06  
  8. 1983-02-19 There is no doubt, based on the content of nutrients, that amaranth seed and leaves are exceptionally nutritious. Amounts of vitamin C, iron, carotene, calcium, folic acid and protein are especially high in the leaves. There are reports that the incidence of blindness in children due to poor...  
  9. 2006-07-20 A few comments and corrections regarding the amaranth article in EDN 91.  
  10. 2012-04-20 Many of you are already familiar withECHO’s previously published book,Amaranth to Zai Holes (A-Z ), acompilation of the first 51 issues ofEDN . Agricultural Options for Small-Scale Farmersis a sequel to A-Z , with contentdrawn primarily from issues 52 through100 of EDN , but also containing...