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1782 items found (Showing 11 - 20)
  1. 2015-04-30 We recently learned of correspondence among several network members on the topic of Conservation Agriculture (CA) in areas of heavy rain. The information seemed potentially helpful for others in ECHO’s network, so we are sharing it here.  
  2. 2002-04-20 Plant-parasitic nematodes are a problem for farmers throughout the tropics and subtropics. Most species of nematodes are not actually plant or animal parasites, but the ones that are parasitic make up a small but important minority.  
  3. 1995-01-19 Alfredo Petrov, Cochabamba, Boliviashares his experience in controlling leafcutterants. James Gordley, Panama.“I am having great results with New Zealand spinach, Tetragonia tetragonioides. Fr. Gerold Rupper, Tanzania.Concerning mothers with insufficient milk for nursing, “This was the problem...  
  4. 1999-10-19 Women who are or might be pregnant should probably not use the seed for medicinal purposes.”  
  5. 2013-04-20 Sometimes the smallest of things can impact human health beyond all proportion to their size. Trace elements are an example of this. Trace elements in an amount that is either above or below certain thresholds in soil, animal feed, or the human diet can have important impacts on the health of...  
  6. 1993-01-01 Some small farmers in the Philippines are using ipil ipil seeds (Leucaena leucocephala) to deworm young goats  
  7. 2005-01-20 These non-leguminous species were used as mulches by ICRAF researchers to increase maize yields. Leaves of both species contain up to 3 percent nitrogen. Surprisingly phosphorus also is found in high quantities in the leaves of these hedgerow weeds.  
  8. 1998-12-19 Cashew (Anacardium occidentale) may be known as a poor man’s crop, but this is probably because it grows well on sandy soils of poor fertility. In Mozambique and Tanzania, cashew occupies lowland areas close to the coast with a rainfall between 900-1300 mm (35.5-52 in) per year.  
  9. Tire gardens have many good uses, including growing a variety of crops where only concrete or poor soils exist, such as urban gardens, homegardens, and refugee camp settings. They can be raised onto supports to keep vegetables out of reach of livestock, and have also been used for vermicompost...
     
  10. 2009-04-01 Phosphorus in the hulls of plant seeds, especially legumes and grains, is bound up in an organic molecule called phytic acid. In addition to the bound phosphorus, phytic acid can interrupt the body’s ability to utilize minerals found in food. Unless the phytic acid molecule is broken down, either...