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905 items found (Showing 41 - 50)
  1. 1992-06-19 Recipe for making catsup (ketchup) from squash.  
  2. 1998-05-19 A conversation concerning the difficulty of obtaining mulch in semi-arid areas.  
  3. 1993-07-19 The international research center CIAT in Cali, Colombia is working (on a small scale) with nuñas. Dr. Jeffery White, CIAT bean physiologist, says the beans do not produce well and are susceptible to most bean diseases, so farmers grow them less and less. “In fact, the crop is probably...  
  4. 2004-10-20 --Some time ago, we received an e-mail request from BruceRobinson. He wrote, “I am an engineer working in Northwest Haiti….most of the plantains and bananas out here have gotten the sickness that the Haitians call Sigatoka. We are about to lose a very important source of revenue and calories. -...
     
  5. 1996-10-19 Some Reflections Resource Center Welcomes Inquiries From Community Health Workers The Appropriate Technology Institute Medical Ambassadors International
     
  6. 1996-10-19 Book Review:Educational and Training Opportunities in Sustainable Agriculture A Resource List from ATTRA Book Review:Extension and Education Materials for Sustainable Agriculture Book Review:Farming for the Future: An Introduction to Low-External Input and Sustainable Agriculture ILEIA...
     
  7. 2001-07-20 Perennials that year after year incorporate atmospheric carbon dioxide into biomass, improve our environment, and give us useful food, feed and fuel are wonderful plants. Residents of West Africa have long recognized the African oil palm (Elaeis guineensis) as such a plant. There may be places...  
  8. 1992-04-01 Discussion of a Neem tree disease in West Africa.  
  9. 2000-03-20 Vetiver grass has such a strong root system it was used to anchor a winch for pulling a vehicle out of a ravine.  
  10. 2008-01-01 This method encourages faithfulness with all that God has given us—sun, soil, rain, time, seed and harvest—in order to experience the God-given potential of the land. The technique involves permanent planting stations, lots of mulch using crop residues, and careful management.