English (en) | Change Language
 

7 items found (Showing 1 - 7)
  1. Dill Anethum graveolens

    Dill

    Dill is a freely-branching, blue-green, feathery-leafed, annual herb, with yellow flowers in an umbrella-like cluster, growing to 1 m tall. Dill has been cultivated for centuries from the Mediterranean to southern Russia for both the seeds and leaves. It is now naturalized and grows wild on...
  2. Basil Ocimum basilicum

    Basil, Sweet Basil

    Basil is an upright, aromatic, annual plant, up to 75 cm in height, and used as a culinary herb and for essential oil. The leaves of basil are often used as a seasoning in tomato sauces and the basis for making pesto. There are many varieties of basil with different colored leaves and unique...
  3. Onion Allium cepa L

    Onion

    Onion is a hardy biennial from southern parts of Russia and Iran. It was disseminated by the Indo-European peoples during their numerous migrations. Very ancient forms of Onion are still for sale in Middle Eastern markets.
  4. Garlic Chives Allium tuberosum

    Garlic Chives, Chinese Chives, Chinese Leek

    Garlic Chives have mild, flat, tender leaves that taste like onion and garlic. Garlic Chives are a perennial, cool season vegetable, which flowers in the hot summer. They can tolerate high temperature and grow in many soil types.
  5. Holy Basil Ocimum tenuiflorum

    Similar planting, care, maintenance, and use as Sweet Basil. Can cross-breed with Sweet Basil as well. Holy Basil has some different culinary uses, primarily in stir fried dishes.
  6. Leek Allium ampeloprasum

    Leek, Blue Leek, Great Headed Garlic, Levant Garlic

    Leeks are a close biennial relative of both onion and garlic, but do not form bulbs. Leaves are flat and large, when cooked they are milder in taste than onions, and are mainly used in soups and similar dishes.
  7. Bunching Onion Allium fistulosum

    Bunching Onion, Scallion

    Bunching onions are perennial (often grown as an annual), and are similar in taste and smell to their relative the common onion, Allium cepa. Though some cultivars have a slightly-thickened base (pseudostem), bunching onions rarely form bulbs. Thus, they are eaten as a green onion.

Looking for more results?

Try Searching All Resources