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50 items found ( Showing 31 - 40)
  1. B.M. Prasanna | Joseph E. Huesing Regina Eddy | Virginia M. Peschke This FAW IPM Guide is designed for use by professionals in plant protection organizations, extension agencies, research institutions, and Governments, whose primary focus is smallholder farmers and the seed systems that support them. The FAW IPM Guide is meant to provide an important foundation...
  2. Report Coordinator: Dustin M. Wenzel (UN Environment), Report Editor: Shannon O’Neill ‘The Economics of Ecosystems and Biodiversity’ (TEEB) is an initiative hosted by United Nations Environment Programme (UN Environment), and coordinated by the TEEB Ofce in Geneva, Switzerland. ‘TEEB for Agriculture & Food’ (TEEBAgriFood) encompasses various research and capacity-building...
  3. Chemically healthy soil has a rich base of the nutrients that plants require for growth, primarily nitrogen, potassium and phosphorus as well as elements such as zinc, copper, iron, chlorine, manganese, molybdenum and others, which are needed in small to very small amounts. These nutrients should...
  4. P. K. Ramachandran Nair Agroforestry has come of age during the past fifteen years. During this period, activities and interest in agroforestry education and training have increased tremendously, as in other aspects of agroforestry development. Today, agroforestry is taught at the senior undergraduate and postgraduate...
    634.99 NAI
  5. Presenting nutrition and biodiversity as a single issue is one of the main rationales of the Cross-Cutting Initiative on Biodiversity for Food and Nutrition, which is led by Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations (FAO) in collaboration with Bioversity International. The overall...
  6. Edited by Chiara Cauda, Camilla Micheletti, Bianca Minerdo Cinzia Scaffidi, Eugenio Signoroni Quinoa was a staple food of the Quechua and Aymara peoples in the Andes region of South America; today it is mainly grown in Bolivia, Peru and Ecuador. Because of its high nutritional value, quinoa is called chisiya, meaning ‘mother grain’ in the Quechua language. Quinoa is known for its great...
  7. Edited by Thomas Fairhurst A question that we get asked at ECHO is “Are you an organic farm?” And the answer is “No. Because of our unique soils, climate and objectives, we do use herbicides, insecticides and mineral fertilizer as needed. At the same time, we aim to minimize our use of and reliance on expensive inputs.”...
    333.761
  8. Plant breeding activities lead to the development and release of improved crop varieties. The purpose of releasing improved crop varieties is to increase productivity and overall crop production to anchor food security. Food security is achievable through mass utilization of varieties which are...
  9. H. J. W. Mutsaers The objective of applied agricultural research is to identify new farming practices and materials that will improve the farmers' production system and increase their productivity and well-being. in a way that can be sustained. Traditionally, this research has been conducted in research stations,...
  10. Food environments is a new concept and its relevance for a better understanding of food systems is still a matter of debate. Researchers have not yet reached a unique agreed-upon definition of food environments but they tend to converge towards a combination of external and personal factors...