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140 items found (Showing 1 - 10)
  1. Key Resource 2015-12-15 Nutrition is an essential component of the work of all health and community workers, including those involved in humanitarian assistance, and yet it is often neglected in their basic training. Drawn from the experiences of an international editor team with extensive field experience,Nutritionfor...  
  2. Key Resource 1998-06-01 This is a much needed practical handbook which bridges the gap between nutritional problems and agricultural solutions. This book helps community workers and local groups identify nutritional needs and grow the required food crops organically.  
  3. 1994-10-19 Information regarding Quinoa.  
  4. 2010-04-01 ECHO emphasizes the many benefits of growing perennial vegetables. By this we mean vegetables that are planted once and eaten from for years. The benefits are many and can be especially helpful to the families of PLWHA, who have diminished labor availability and perhaps less land and money to...  
  5. 1994-10-19 In some parts of the world people roast sorghum, as is done with corn (roasting ears) in the United States. Roasting bird resistant sorghum at the dough stage may not sufficiently remove the cyanogenic glycoside dhurrin.  
  6. 2000-06-20 A report on the work of Nikolaus and Gabriele Foidl with Moringa in Nicaragua.  
  7. 2005-04-20 Dark green leafy vegetables are good sources of vitamin A, vitamin C, riboflavin, folic acid, carotenes, iron, calcium, magnesium and potassium. DGLV are sources of trace minerals that take part in key enzymatic reactions in our body. They also are great sources of fiber. As a rule of thumb, the...  
  8. 2017-04-12 Dr. Brian Hilton researched and promoted biofortified crops for over 20 years. Brian worked as part of a team testing the first orange sweet potato varieties in Mozambique in 2002. He has 25 years of experience working with farmers in Indonesia, Chad and Mozambique. Brian now works with World...  
  9. 1996-04-19 Home grown beans produce less gas.  
  10. 2008-10-20 Faba bean is one of the oldest dual-use food and fodder species. The beans are rich in minerals (calcium, phosphorus) and vitamins. Containing approximately 26% protein, 2% fat, and 50% carbohydrate, faba bean is considered in some regions to be superior to field peas or other legumes as a human...