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48 items found (Showing 31 - 40)
  1. 2008-07-20 Brief descriptions of annual underutilized crops for which ECHO provides seeds.  
  2. 2009-10-20 The main purpose of this article is to provide introductory information for those who are new to peanuts and may be wondering how peanut varieties or subspecies may differ from each other.  
  3. 1994-07-19 Dry logs inhabited by fire ants can help deter rats from eating young oil palms.  
  4. 2007-10-20 Winged bean (Psophocarpus tetragonolobus), an amazingly productive and multi-purpose legume, grows as a vine typically staked on 1.5 to 2 m (5 to 6.5 ft) poles or trellises. Likely originating in the Asian tropics, it thrives in hot, humid areas and grows at elevations up to 2000 m (6562 ft).  
  5. 2003-01-20 Chaya is sometimes dubbed "the spinach tree." It is a fast growing drought and disease-resistant shrub that provides large quantities of edible, very nutritious leaves.  
  6. 2009-07-20 Many of you have graciously taken the time to fill out the seed harvest report form that accompanies each mailing of seeds from our seed bank. In reading reports from people in our network, we want to learn whether the seeds we are sending out have improved the lives of poor small-holder farmers....  
  7. 2004-07-01 Pigeon pea plants are shaken gently so that the pod borer larvae fall off. As the larvae fall, they are collected on a sheet that is pulled along the ground between the rows of plants. A few hens follow and eat the protein-rich larvae.  
  8. 1995-03-19 A technique to control Colorado Potato Beetles. The Colorado potato beetle has become resistant to many pesticides. An innovative technique developed by AgCanada and researched by Cornell is the use of “trench traps” to catch the beetles as they walk out of fields in search of new food sources or...  
  9. 1993-10-19 Iron sulfate can be used to control slugs. Recent laboratory trials in England support the notion that iron sulfate is rapidly absorbed and is highly toxic to slugs.  
  10. 1996-04-19 The species covered include: African rice, finger millet, fonio (acha), pearl millets, sorghums (subsistence, commercial, specialty, and fuel and utility types), tef, other cultivated grains (guinea millet, emmer, irregular barley, and Ethiopian oats), and wild grains.