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188 items found (Showing 1 - 10)
  1. Key Resource 2000-01-21 ECHO is frequently asked, by groups or individuals from North America, to suggest vegetable seeds to take with them on short trips overseas. Often the group is a “work team” that is being sent by a church. Someone with the group they are going to visit has asked them to bring vegetable seeds. Or...  
  2. Key Resource 2005-01-20 The leaves of the Moringa oleifera tree are very nutritious. They can be consumed fresh, cooked or dried. Since dried Moringaleaves retain their nutrient content, it is possible to convert them into leaf powder. When there is an abundance of leaves, this leaf powder can be made and stored easily....  
  3. Key Resource 1990-08-01 A clear, nontechnical explanation of how plants work, and our bestselling book. It succeeds in explaining the complex processes of plant growth, functions, adaptation, responses, and reproduction in simple language. As the author intended, the gardener can come to understand a plant "from the...  
  4. SW Florida’s hot, humid summers have a lot in common with rainforest conditions, minus the shade of tall trees and of course with less total rainfall and not quite as high humidity. So it is not surprising that some of the standard vegetables in ECHO’s summer gardens originated in tropical...  
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  6. Moringa is a very popular tropical fast growing tree up to 15 m in height. The young pods can be eaten and the leaves are an excellent source of calcium, vitamins, minerals and protein. The tree has a loose crown and can also be used for a hedge, living fence or windbreak. It coppices well to...  
  7. African Moringa is a fast growing tree up to 15 m in height. It grows at higher and drier locations than M. oleifera. In comparison to M. oleifera, M. stenopetala has larger leaves with a milder taste when eaten raw, provides more shade, has a stockier and more bushy growth habit, can be more...