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  1. Key Resource
    2011-01-01 Often farmers asked for seed, but we weren’t quite sure what to expect when we suggested—to the farmers’ union in Nampula, Mozambique—that they organize a fair in which the members could come together and exchange seed. They might only be interested in “improved” varieties. However, when we...  
  2. Key Resource This article is from ECHO Asia Note # 31. Saving your own seeds can be a cost-effective way to access crop seed for future planting and to help maintain the planet’s plant biodiversity. Whether you plant your own saved seeds, give them away to friends and neighbors, or distribute them through...  
  3. Key Resource 2000-01-21 ECHO is frequently asked, by groups or individuals from North America, to suggest vegetable seeds to take with them on short trips overseas. Often the group is a “work team” that is being sent by a church. Someone with the group they are going to visit has asked them to bring vegetable seeds. Or...  
  4. 2019-04-20 In this Issue : 5th Symposium on Sustainable Agriculture and Appropriate Technologies Environmental Conservation Empowering Small-scale Farmers with Seeds History of Maresha Plow  
  5. 1999-03-19 This is a good example of how quickly seeds can multiply. “Of the 8 seeds that were sent 4 were planted in a placewhere sunlight was restricted to about 4 hours a day. These gave very few pods. The 4 others got more sunlight and we got a harvest of 185 seeds so far. We have planted 160 of these...  
  6. 1992-06-19 Comments about sending seeds to ECHO.  
  7. 1992-06-19 Information about obtaining Plant Import Permits for the USA.  
  8. 2005-07-20 Black Sapote is eaten fresh after the fruit has ripened and softened and the inside has turned into a dark brown chocolate color.  
  9. 1996-01-19 Information about onion seed germination in the tropics.  
  10. 2007-10-20 Winged bean (Psophocarpus tetragonolobus), an amazingly productive and multi-purpose legume, grows as a vine typically staked on 1.5 to 2 m (5 to 6.5 ft) poles or trellises. Likely originating in the Asian tropics, it thrives in hot, humid areas and grows at elevations up to 2000 m (6562 ft).