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65 items found (Showing 1 - 10)
  1. Key Resource
    1984-04-20 This technical note was published in the early 80's when there were relatively few sources of information on, or seed for the the neem tree. In recent years much progress has been made in each of these areas. The information contained in this technical note is still quite valuable. A good source...  
  2. Key Resource 2019-02-15 This article is from ECHO Asia Note # 37. Seed saving in sub-tropical and tropical climates is challenging. Without equipment designed to maintain dry and cool environments, the quality of seeds may quickly deteriorate. High temperature and humidity during storage increase seed metabolism and...  
  3. Key Resource 2006-01-01 Dr. Martin Price, co-founder of ECHO and former head of ECHO’s Agricultural Resources Department, has said, “I would consider chaya to be one of the five most important underutilized food plants ECHO distributes. I give it this rank because of its ability to thrive in both arid and rainy regions,...  
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  5. Chaya (Cnidoscolus aconitifolius)1, sometimes called the spinach tree, is a fast-growing perennial shrub native to Mexico that produces lots of attractive, large, dark green leaves. It can grow well on a wide range of soils in both hot, rainy climates and areas with occasional drought. It grows...  
  6. Insects and other pests can be a serious constraint to food production, especially where resources for pest management are scarce. For example, inEDN 133, we responded to a question about problems with tomato leaf miner (Tuta absoluta) in Nigeria. Heavy infestations of this pest alone can reduce...  
  7. 2003-07-20 In response to the articles on leaf protein concentrate and on chaya in EDN Issue 78, a reader asked whether or not leaf protein concentrate (LPC) could safely be made from chaya.  
  8. 2001-10-20 Varroa mites (two strains of Varroa destructor), which parasitize the Western honey bee (Apis mellifera) over much of the world, can seriously weaken and even kill honey bee colonies. Some possibilities for control are discussed.  
  9. 1992-06-19 The U. S. Department of Agriculture is recommending that home gardeners use a cooking oil spray to control aphids, white flies and spider mites.Researchers claim that the oil spray is only about one-third as costly as commercial pesticides with equivalent effectiveness. Recipe for an oil and soap...  
  10. 2003-07-20 In addition to controlling termites, boric acid can be used to control cockroaches and ants.