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7 items found (Showing 1 - 7)
  1. Key Resource 2016-09-28 Farmers in many parts of the world, because of human population growth, have little choice but to crop their land continuously, with scarce resources to replace nutrients withdrawn by each successive crop. Crop residues are often lost as a source of organic matter and mulch, usually through...  
  2. Key Resource 2016-03-22 Yearly production of grains, pulses, and vegetables depends on a reliable supply of quality seed. This is true for the farmer growing a crop to feed their family as well as for the agricultural worker evaluating and growing out seeds of a new crop species or variety that could improve lives. In...  
  3. 2015-11-19 Small farmers around the world are cautious when making changes to the practices they use or the crops they grow; especially as their family’s food and income depend on the harvest. However with challenges such as decreasing soil fertility or erratic rainfall, they are increasingly willing to...  
  4. 2015-11-18 Vegetable growing can provide nutrition and livelihood for those isolated by poverty, recovering from crisis, and/or diversifying their food and income options -- but gains are not automatic. What should be considered in designing and deploying vegetable gardening programs? What seed...  
  5. 2016-04-08 Sara Delaney presented at ECHO’s November 2015 International Agriculture Conference. One project she mentioned had remarkable adoption rates, and we thought it would make a good case study to share in EDN. In the course of introducing new ideas or practices, why are some accepted more easily,...  
  6. 2015-01-20 Storing seeds in the tropics can often be difficult; with high temperatures and humid conditions, seeds lose their ability to germinate quickly. Many techniques for seed storage exist, from the high-tech standards of gene banks to simple methods used by villagers for saving their own seeds. All...  
  7. 2015-01-20 Sorghum is primarily self-pollinated, meaning that a sorghum plant will accept pollen from its own flowers. Sorghum can also accept pollen from other sorghum plants (cross-pollination) by means of wind or insect transfer. Cultivated sorghum is generally cross-pollinated between 2 and 10%, with...  

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