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56 items found (Showing 1 - 10)
  1. 2020-10-16 Below is a summary of a seed trial report ECHO received in 2013 from Peace Corps Volunteer Chris Peterson, working in Uganda (Nalugala, Wakiso District). Sharing the results of Peterson’s efforts serves as an example of what to expect from a seed trial. Trying new crops can be very challenging,...  
  2. 2019-07-24 Network member Lance Edwards works in Zimbabwe. He told us about using and promoting inexpensive, water-conserving planting beds that he calls 100-fold gardens. These are a type of “wicking bed”; they are lined with plastic so that water pools at the bottom in a reservoir. From there, water moves...  
  3. 2017-01-16 This article summarizes several of the plenary sessions presented at the 2016 ECHO conference in Florida. If you were unable to attend the conference, or would like to review some of the talks, many of them can be viewed on ECHOcommunity. Other 2016 presentations that appear there include...  
  4. 2016-10-18 While doing legume intercropping research in South Africa (2010-2015), ECHO staff members learned about a system of cereal/cowpea production developed in Nigeria through research by IITA (International Institute of Tropical Agriculture) and national partners (Ajeigbe et al. 2010a, Ajeigbe et al....  
  5. 2016-10-18 Paper mulberry is native to China, Japan, Korea, Laos, Cambodia, Thailand, Burma and Assam (India), but cultivated extensively elsewhere in Asia and the Pacific. It has also naturalized in parts of southern Europe and the USA (Kew 2016). According to the World Agroforestry Centre, paper mulberry...  
  6. 2016-07-11 Companion planting is a form of intercropping, typically practiced in small-scale gardens, in which two or more species of plants are grown near each other for shared benefit. For example, shade-loving vegetables like lettuce can be grown under taller crops like maize or sunflower. Mixed...  
  7. 2016-04-08 A report from Roland Bunch regarding his efforts to promote green manures and cover crops in Africa.  
  8. 2014-10-20 Nathanael Szobody submitted the following in response to an update in EDN 123 on research ECHO is doing in South Africa. We thought these comments were particularly interesting and insightful, as they illustrate the contribution that farmers can make to further our understanding of agricultural...  
  9. 2013-07-20 Job’s tears is a 1 to 2 m tall grass thought to originate from Southeast Asia. It is found throughout most of the tropics, often in wild stands along ditches and streams. Depending on the variety, the seeds are yellow, purple or brown and are often tearshaped; hence, the name “Job’s tears.” There...  
  10. 2013-04-20 The article by Dov Pasternak about lablab (in this issue) reminded me of material in ECHO’s files from many years ago. Reimar von Schaaffhausen, working in São Paulo, Brazil, sent articles and letters over the years about the valuable role that lablab (and pigeon pea [Cajanus cajan]) have played...