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29 items found (Showing 1 - 10)
  1. Smallholder systems exist under a broad range of climatic conditions. There are some basic considerations, however, that applyin nearly every set of conditions. Soil and water conservation Productivity of both crops and animals depends on the availability of water and fertile soil.Where there is...  
  2. 1993-07-19 Wayne DeYoung in Haiti writes about a pump that he is sure will interest ournetwork. It was used in a water well project by Dan Cook and others in Haiti. Wayne believes that it has phenomenal value for many gardening situations along rivers or ponds or where a hand dug well is available. His...  
  3. 1993-07-19 Martin Gingerich, Haiti. The note in EDN 39-4 on using Guinea grass,Panicum maximum, as a mulch for onions arrived while Martin was learning about a traditional system using Guinea grass in Haiti. This is in an area near La Valee Jacmel at about 800-1000 meters and 2,000 mm (80 inches) of...  
  4. 1996-01-19 Colored Plastic Mulcheshave been found toimprove yields and fruit quality in some vegetable crops.  
  5. 1996-10-19 Zai Holes Harness Termites to Increase Crop Yields Grass Mulch: An Innovative Way of Gardening in the Dry Tropics Colored Plastic Mulches Thick Mulch for No-Till Gardens Rice Hull Mulch  
  6. 1997-11-19 Principles for increasing organic matter in order to increase soil fertility. Little by little, work in a dozen countries has convinced us that the vast majority of soils can be made highly fertile. How? By using our first principle:maximize organic matter production.  
  7. 1997-11-19 One of the immediate problems directly affecting agricultural output and quality of life in Niger is the severe deforestation which has occurred, particularly since the 1960’s. Simply planting more trees does not solve the problems. Farmer Managed Natural Regeneration is a practice that protects...  
  8. 1998-05-19 A conversation concerning the difficulty of obtaining mulch in semi-arid areas.  
  9. 1998-08-19 The seed of some fifty Australian dry-zone acacia species are a traditional food of Australian Aboriginal people. In Australia they have not been domesticated and until recently have had a low status as “outback bush plants.”  
  10. 1998-12-19 Certain seeds have been shown to respond to smoke before they will germinate, even when there is no fire.