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  1. Fruit/Vegetable Edible parts -Fruit, Seeds, Nuts, Leaves, Flowers, Vegetable An erect, branched evergreen tree. It can grow to 10-40 m high and is long lived. (Trees grown by vegetative means are smallerand more compact.) Trees spread to 15 m across. It has strong deep roots. The trunk is thick....
  2. 1992-01-01 The previous editions of this Agrodok, published in 1992 and 1999, gave a general introduction into fruit growing in the tropics and described 8 major crops. Working on this revision, the general introduction quickly filled the entire Agrodok! And if the major fruit crops are to be dealt with...
  3. Edible portion: Fruit A tree up to 15 m high that branches near the base giving a spreading open tree. The leaves are smaller (25 cm x 10 cm) and more pointed than Malay apple and on short stalks. Flowers are about 3 cm wide and white. They are on leafy twigs. It produces clusters of attractive...
  4. Edible portion:Fruit, Herb, Spice, Leaves - flavouring A small much branched evergreen tree. It grows up to 5-6 m tall with short sharp spines. It spreads to 3 m across. The leaves are small and dark green. There are narrow wings on the leaf stalk. The leaf blade is about 5 cm long by 3 cm wide...
  5. Edible portion: Fruit A tree. It grows 6-13 m tall. The crown is small and open. The trunk is 30-50 cm across. The bark peels off. The leaves are simple and red when young. The leaves are narrow and 4-7 cm long. The flowers are white and occur singly in the axils of the leaves. The fruit is the...
  6. Edible portion: Fruit Natural and artificial hybrids between grapefruit and mandarin. A small evergreen tree. It is often a thinly branched shrub. It has an open habit. It grows 4-6 m high. There are thorns in the axils of leaves. The leaves are simple and leathery. They are smooth and shiny....
  7. 1986-01-01 A classification of tropical tree crops - particularly those grown for their fruit - is presented, based on: Branching habit growth rythm The classification reveals a pattern in the confusing multitude of tree crops; its usefulness is enhanced because of similarities in ecology and fruitfulness...
  8. 1986-01-01 This book sets out to provide background and detailed information on the production of temperate and subtropical fruit in New Zealand.
  9. 1920-01-19 The reason for scarcity of fruits in regions where, by climatic indications, one would expect them to be most abundant, is not to be found in any single fact, but is, perhaps, largely the result of three causes: first, the enervating effect of heat, which discourages man from undertaking work...
  10. 1992-01-01 This book is the product of generations of men and women who planted their passion for tropical fruit in general and mangoes in particular in the soil of South Florida, the growing point of a continent. Includes full-color illustrations, descriptions, recipes, and a glossary. (2 Copies)